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Predator 2 (comic)

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Predator 2 issue 1
Predator 2
Written by Franz Henkel
Illustrated by Dan Barry (#1)
Mark Bright (#2)
Inked by Randy Emberlin
Lettered by Gail Beckett (#1)
Mike Heisler (#2)
Colored by Lurene Haines (#1)
Monika Livingston (#2)
Cover(s) by
Edited by Randy Stradley
Publisher Dark Horse Comics
Release date(s) Feb-June 1991
Media type
Preceded by Predator: God's Truth
Concurrent Predator: Big Game
Followed by Predator: Cold War
Alternate cover
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Predator 2 is a two-issue comic book adaptation of the film of the same name that was published by Dark Horse Comics from February-June 1991. It was written by Franz Henkel, based on the original screenplay by Jim and John Thomas. Each issue was created by a different team — issue #1 was illustrated by Dan Barry and Mark Bright, inked by Randy Emberlin, lettered by Gail Beckett and colored by Lurene Haines; issue #2 was illustrated by Mark Bright, inked by Emberlin, lettered by Mike Heisler and colored by Monika Livingston. The series was edited by Randy Stradley.

In the Predator comics line, Predator 2 was preceded by Predator: God's Truth, published concurrently with Predator: Big Game, and was followed by Predator: Cold War.

Publisher's SummaryEdit

#1: The year is 1997, and the deadliest hunters in the galaxy have just located the finest hunting ground in our solar system: violence-torn Los Angeles. The war on drugs has become just that, with the LAPD fighting a losing battle on a dozen fronts, the last thing Detective Mike Harrigan needs is interference from the Predators. Dark Horse Comics proudly presents the official comics adaptation of the motion picture starring Danny Glover and Rubén Blades.

#2: Detective Mike Harrigan goes one-on-one with the killer from outer space, and all the government's special OWLF team can do is get in his way! Dark Horse Comics proudly presents the official comic book adaptation of the motion picture sequel to Predator, starring Danny Glover and Rubén Blades.

Differences from the FilmEdit

The comic presents a fairly faithful adaptation of the film, with minor additions and deletions compared to the movie on which it is based. Several of the alterations are shared with the film's novelization.

  • Tony Pope is a far more insignificant character than he is in the film, appearing in only a single scene later in the comic — all of his other appearances are cut. In fact, the news reporters in general barely feature, unlike in the movie where they are frequently seen covering the events of the story.
  • Leona actually shoots El Scorpio several times when he bursts into the corridor firing as he flees the Predator massacre, but he is protected by his body armor.
  • The scene where Harrigan argues with Deputy Chief Heinemann outside the tenement after the shootout, and subsequently watches Keyes and his men arrive, is absent in the comic. Instead, a brief flashback shows some history between Harrigan and Heinemann, explaining that the latter has burned political bridges to help Harrigan's career.
  • Harrigan mentions that the party at the bar is for Leona's birthday, whereas in the film the meeting there is never implied to be a special occasion. This is also in the novelization.
  • Harrigan's suspicions about the mystery killer are aroused at Ramon Vega's apartment when he sees several implausibly clean cuts through the solid steel beams in the walls and ceilings.
  • The conversation where Keyes tries to warn Harrigan off the case by threatening to have him "disappeared" occurs in private, on Vega's balcony, unlike in the film where Keyes angrily confronts Harrigan in front of all those present. Keyes also has a senior police officer assisting him in the comic, taking charge of the forensic examination of the crime scene.
  • Back at the station following the massacre at Vega's apartment, Harrigan asks Leona to contact his friend Nathan Caldwell with the FBI in Washington to find out more about Keyes; in the film, he simply asks Jerry to find out what he can on his own.
  • The meeting at the bar, during Leona's birthday party, happens off-screen in the comic, and is simply narrated by Harrigan as we see Danny sneaking around Vega's apartment looking for clues.
  • After killing Danny, the Predator scales a skyscraper with his skull and raises his Combi-Stick to the sky, attracting a bolt of lightning. This also happens in the film, but much later, and the Predator is holding Jerry's skull at the time. The novelization, meanwhile, matches the comic.
  • Harrigan, Leona, Jerry and Captain Pilgrim attend Danny's funeral. Afterwards, Harrigan is accosted by Tony Pope (his only appearance in the comic) who hounds him for a story, but Pilgrim punches him in the face. Afterwards, Pilgrim unofficially backs Harrigan's vendetta against the mystery killer.
  • When he is confronted by the Predator, King Willie attempts to shoot the creature to death with a sub-machine gun, but to no avail. He is likewise armed in the novel, but carries only a rapier in the film. Before killing him, the Predator quotes King Willie's final words from his conversation with Harrigan, saying, "Time to go. Prepare yourself!" Later on, crime scene photographs reveal King Willie was not beheaded like in the film.
  • Brian is called Anthony in the comic. He also has this name in the novelization.
  • The comic makes it clear the Predator actively follows Leona and Jerry onto the subway, seeking to kill them. The film is more ambiguous as to whether the Predator finds them by chance or design, although the novel also makes it clear the attack is targeted.
  • When Harrigan arrives outside the subway, he finds Heinemann being savaged by furious news reporters, who want to know why the LAPD has failed to find the killer and why Keyes' team, who the police had bowed down to, has now vanished. Heinemann begs Harrigan to help him deal with the situation, but he refuses, leaving Heinemann to burn. The scene is in the novelization, and was also filmed for the movie, but not used.
  • When describing the Self-Destruct Device to Harrigan, Keyes claims the explosion in Val Verde levelled "200 acres of rainforest", not 300 city blocks as in the film. Keyes also claims different motivations for his pursuit of the Predator — his team is simply trying to ensure the bomb does not go off in the city, and hope to capture the creature and disarm the device before it can devastate Los Angeles.
  • The initial fight between Harrigan and the Predator in the slaughterhouse is far shorter in the comic, with Harrigan gunning the creature down as soon as he blasts his way inside.
  • Keyes is beheaded by the Smart-Disc, not bisected as in the film.
  • When Harrigan cuts of the Predator's arm, the creature does not fall into the adjacent apartment building, but straight down into the alleyway. Harrigan likewise climbs all the way down to the ground, before following the Predator inside, down an elevator shaft, and through the sewers.
  • During the fight on the Mother Ship, the Predator continually taunts Harrigan with recordings of Danny's voice.
  • The flintlock pistol given to Harrigan by the Elder on baord the ship is marked "Vito de la Mirandella Anno Domini 1640". The date 1640 is also used in the novelization, but in the film the gun is inscribed "Raphael Adolini 1715".
  • When the Mother Ship departs, it flies out of one of Los Angeles' iconic storm drains.

Reprint HistoryEdit

Predator 2 was to be serialized and reprinted in the United Kingdom by Trident Comics in their planned Predator magazine, beginning in March 1992. However, Trident went bankrupt before the magazine began publication.[1] As a result, the comic has never been collected or reissued.


Issue coversEdit

See AlsoEdit


  1. "Hasslein Blog - The Alien/Predator Comic Strips, Part Two". Retrieved on 2015-06-15.

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