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Aliens: Havoc

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Aliens: Havoc
Written by Mark Schultz
Illustrated by Various
Inked by Various
Colored by Pamela Rambo
Lettered by Clem Robins
Cover(s) by Kent Williams (#1)
Duncan Fegredo (#2)
Edited by Philip Amara
Scott Allie
Publisher Dark Horse Comics
Release date(s) June-July 1997
Media type
Pages
ISBN
Era
Timeline
Series
Chronology
Preceded by Aliens: Border Lines
Concurrent Aliens: Special
Followed by Aliens: Purge
Alternate cover
[[Image:|center|200px]]

Aliens: Havoc is a special two-issue limited comic book series that was first published by Dark Horse Comics from June-July 1997. It was written by Mark Schultz, colored by Pamela Rambo, lettered by Clem Robins and edited by Philip Amara and Scott Allie. A special "artists jam" comic, Aliens: Havoc featured various artists taking over the illustration duties after approximately every two pages of the story. Cover art for issue 1 was provided by Kent Williams, while cover art for issue 2 was by Duncan Fegredo.

The artists who worked on Aliens: Havoc were: Leif Jones, John Stokes, Duncan Fegredo, D'Isreali, John Totleben, Arthur Adams, Gary Gianni, Geof Darrow, George Pratt, Igor Kordey, Paul Lee, John K. Snyder III, Mark A. Nelson, Pete Bagge, Brian Horton, Dave Taylor, Kelley Jones, Guy Davis, Kellie Strom, Jay Stephens, Jerry Bingham, Kevin Nowlan, Frank Teran, Joel Naprstek, Travis Charest, P. Craig Russell, Adian Potts, Sean Phillips, Rebecca Guay, Jon Muth, Kilian Plunkett, Ron Randall, John Pound, Gene Ha, Vania Zarouliov, Sergio Aragonés, John Paul Leon, Derek Thompson, David Lloyd, Mœbius, Dave Cooper, Mike Allred and Tony Millionaire.

In the Aliens comics line, Aliens: Havoc was preceded by Aliens: Border Lines, published concurrently with Aliens: Special, and was followed by Aliens: Purge.

Publisher's SummaryEdit

#1: One incredible story. Forty amazing creators. A hive of deadly Aliens. That's what we call Havoc. Some of the biggest names in comics — including Art Adams, George Pratt, Kelley Jones, Kevin Nowlan, and Kent Williams — illustrate Eisner Award winner Mark Schultz's story of a haunted space station infested with aliens.

#2: It's got twenty-two amazing artists, too many bloodthirsty Aliens, and plenty of action and mystery! It's the conclusion to the two-issue miniseries — so why not join us for the havoc!?

PlotEdit

The Lunar Maru was once Weyland-Yutani's safest, most opulent star liner ever built, and the proud flagship of the Red Giant Line. Now, it's a floating derelict, pinned to the midst of an asteroid belt for what must have been months. In light of these tragic and mysterious events, Weyland-Yutani uses the crew of Trispast Salvage, a company they recently acquired, to investigate and recover the remains of the Lunar Maru.

Unbeknownst to the Trispast Salvage crew, Weyland-Yutani was secretly using their own Red Giant Line passenger ships as covers to conduct illegal experiments involving Linguafoeda acheronsis (Aliens).

A disembodied voice, a consciousness, once belonging to the physical body of the Lunar Maru's main researcher, biochemist Gropius Lysenko, is still trapped on board. Lysenko's consciousness guides the Trispast Salvage crew through the ship, with Linguafoeda around every corner, to his secret laboratory. His Consciousness does this by momentarily possessing and speaking through a number of the crew members, hoping to make amends for his actions in the past which left his ship, and the entire crew aboard, dead in space.

Reprint HistoryEdit

Aliens: Havoc was eventually collected as part of Aliens Omnibus: Volume 5 in October 2008.

The complete comic was released digitally through Dark Horse Digital on July 3, 2013, reusing Kent Williams' cover art from issue 1.

Behind the ScenesEdit

Series writer Mark Schultz also wrote the stories Aliens: Apocalypse - The Destroying Angels and Predator: Hell & Hot Water, among others, in the Aliens, Predator and Aliens vs. Predator universe.

Trivia Edit

  • Aliens: Havoc is presented in a distinctive style, whereby the action is always seen through a first-person perspective from an off-panel character's point of view. This style is possibly unique among comic books and provided a creative challenge that required considerable editorial planning to maintain the first-person point of view, and also required some of the artists involved to do some redrawing.

GalleryEdit

Issue coversEdit

OtherEdit

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